North Carolina Cannabis Information Portal

North Carolina Cannabis Information Portal

Serving the community since 2008.

Marijuana Laws
Learn all about marijuana legislation in North Carolina including the laws governing the cultivation, processing, distribution, sales, and use of marijuana and marijuana product
Marijuana Laws
Learn all about marijuana legislation in North Carolina including the laws governing the cultivation, processing, distribution, sales, and use of marijuana and marijuana product
Marijuana Business
North Carolina (704) 285-2384has specific licenses for marijuana growers, processors, transporters, dispensaries, microbusinesses, and event organizers. Know what it takes to start a marijuana business in the state
Marijuana Business
North Carolina (704) 285-2384has specific licenses for marijuana growers, processors, transporters, dispensaries, microbusinesses, and event organizers. Know what it takes to start a marijuana business in the state
Medical Marijuana
Following a House Committee striking down a 2014 bill proposing the medicinal use of cannabis, medical marijuana remains illegal in North Carolina. However, the state permits people living with intractable epilepsy to use CBD oil. On the other hand, the law making this limited use legal does not establish legal means to purchase CBD products in the state.
Medical Marijuana
Following a House Committee striking down a 2014 bill proposing the medicinal use of cannabis, medical marijuana remains illegal in North Carolina. However, the state permits people living with intractable epilepsy to use CBD oil. On the other hand, the law making this limited use legal does not establish legal means to purchase CBD products in the state.
CBD
CBD products containing up to 0.3% THC are allowed in North Carolina. The state’s CBD laws permit wide access to such hemp-derived CBD but only allows CBD products with higher THC levels for approved individuals living with intractable epilepsy.
CBD
CBD products containing up to 0.3% THC are allowed in North Carolina. The state’s CBD laws permit wide access to such hemp-derived CBD but only allows CBD products with higher THC levels for approved individuals living with intractable epilepsy.

What is the State of Marijuana in North Carolina

Marijuana is considered illegal for all purposes in North Carolina. However, North Carolina does allow the limited use of cannabis products or specifically low-THC CBD oils, as an alternative treatment for intractable forms of epilepsy. Intractable epilepsy is a form of epilepsy that has not responded, or no longer responds, to conventional medications.

The North Carolina legislature passed the Epilepsy Alternative Treatment Act, also known as Hope 4 Hailey and Friends Act, in 2014. This law enabled doctors affiliated with the neurology departments of four state universities to recommend cannabis for patients with intractable seizure disorders. The state universities in this program were Wake Forest University, Duke University, East Carolina University, and the University of North Carolina (UNC).

Neurologists affiliated with these universities could recommend medical marijuana that was predominantly cannabidiol (CBD) with trace amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). CBD is an active compound in cannabis that possesses no psychotropic properties and is recognized to have therapeutic effects. Patients in the program were given identification cards that enabled them to possess the cannabis products recommended by their neurologists. Neurologists approved to make recommendations had to be part of the program, i.e., registered with the study in any of the universities. The CBD oil used by the patient had to contain less than 0.3% THC and at least 10% CBD, by weight, to meet legal standards. Patients' details were tracked and analyzed to ascertain the need and viability of a statewide program.

The Epilepsy Alternative Treatment Act was amended in 2016 with the passage of HB 766 by the North Carolina legislature. HB 766 changed certain specifications in the law to increase accessibility by local residents. It included provisions stipulating that any board-certified neurologist affiliated with any state-licensed hospital can recommend medical marijuana (low-THC CBD) as treatment. The amendment also modified the standards for legal medical marijuana in the state to:

  • Less than 0.9% THC
  • At least 5% CBD by weight
  • No psychoactive effects or substances

Marijuana possession is partially decriminalized in North Carolina. Possession of 0.5 ounces of cannabis (or less) is a misdemeanor that carries a $200 fine in the state.

How has Marijuana affected the North Carolina Economy

Marijuana is illegal in North Carolina and is not available for sale. As such, it is not taxed and does not generate revenue for the economy of the State of North Carolina. Consequently, it can be inferred that marijuana has no direct effect on the economy of the state. Even low-THC CBD, which is legal to possess in the state, can not be obtained in the state. This is because there are no state-regulated procedures for obtaining CBD extracts and caregivers have to purchase them out of state.

Proponents of marijuana legalization assert North Carolina could net tens of millions of dollars in revenue from the taxation of legal marijuana. Michigan, a state with similarities in population size and tax system operations, netted $45 million in marijuana tax revenue in 2020. Legal marijuana in North Carolina could add similar figures to the state's annual tax revenue.

What is the Marijuana Crime Rate in North Carolina

Marijuana is still completely illegal in North Carolina, but the Epilepsy Alternative Treatment Act enables specific individuals to legally possess low-THC CBD cannabis extracts. The Act does not make provisions for the production, distribution, and sales of CBD extracts in the state, and most residents procure it out-of-state. However, a comparison of arrest figures prior to and following the passage of the legislation indicated a decrease in marijuana-related arrests in North Carolina.

In the year before legalization (2014), there were 22,773 marijuana arrests, with 92% being for possession and only 8% for sales. After low-THC CBD was legalized (2016), arrests for marijuana possession dropped to 14,619, and arrests for sales to 1,270. The 15,899 total arrests represented a 30.2% decrease from the pre-legalization figures of 2014.

How to Get a Medical Marijuana Card in North Carolina

North Carolina does not issue identification cards to registered patients in the medical marijuana program. Instead, patients' caregivers are required to register with the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) to be able to legally obtain medical cannabis on behalf of the patients. A qualified designated caregiver in North Carolina must be at least 18 years old and a legal resident of the state. A caregiver must also be the parent, legal guardian, or custodian of the patient if the patient is a minor. The applicant must complete and submit a caregiver's registration form, along with a copy of a valid photo ID, such as an N.C. driver's license. During their application, the caregiver must also provide:

  • The name and address of their patient
  • The neurologist's name and address
  • The neurologist's hospital affiliation
  • A written attestation from the neurologist affirming the patient's condition

Mail the completed application and all supporting documents to:

N.C. Epilepsy Alternative Treatment Registration

3008 Mail Service Center

Raleigh, NC 27699-3008

The DHHS will process the caregiver application and mail a caregiver letter to the applicat, if it is approved. The DHHS caregiver registration letter will identify the person as a registered caregiver in North Carolina and enable them to legally carry cannabis extracts in the state. The letter should always be in the caregiver's possession and must be provided upon request by law enforcement officers.

What is the History of North Carolina Marijuana

Marijuana, or hemp, has been cultivated in North Carolina since the late eighteenth century. The State Assembly passed a bill passed in 1762 that allowed North Carolina hemp to be cultivated and exported. Tolerance for marijuana dropped drastically in the twentieth century, most conspicuously after the influx of Mexican immigrants following the Mexican Revolution of 1910. The Poison Act of 1907 was amended in 1913 to include marijuana and restrict its access. The Poison Act was enacted to regulate the sale of certain substances by requiring a physician's written order, without which the sale was prohibited. Marijuana was made illegal in the United States with the passage of the Marihuana Tax Act in 1937. This federal law made marijuana illegal in the country, except for medicinal and industrial use. The 1970 Controlled Substances Act repealed the Marihuana Tax Act but effectively outlawed marijuana for all uses by labeling it a Schedule 1 drug. Schedule 1 drugs, under the Controlled Substances Act, are considered to have no acceptable medical applications and a high potential for abuse.

The passage of the Controlled Substances Act led to a surge in marijuana-related arrests over the next few years. In an effort to reduce the arrest rates and ease the strain on resources, several states, including North Carolina, chose to decriminalize marijuana possession. In 1977, North Carolina reduced the possession of 0.5 ounces of cannabis or less to a misdemeanor with a maximum fine of $200.

There was an initiative introduced in 2014 in the North Carolina legislature to legalize medical marijuana that was defeated in the House Committee. The Committee further issued an unfavorable report that blocked consideration of any bill concerning MMJ for the next two years.

In 2015 Governor Pat McCrory signed HB766 into law, amending the Epilepsy Alternative Treatment Act passed the previous year. This enabled patients diagnosed with intractable epilepsy to use CBD-based cannabis extracts with low THC as an alternative treatment to conventional medications. The cannabis extract can only contain trace amounts of THC - less than 0.9% by weight - and at least 5% CBD. The patient must be diagnosed by a neurologist affiliated with any state-licensed hospital in North Carolina with a severe seizure disorder, such as intractable epilepsy.